Upcoming Events


Tepknuset—Hunter's Moon Celebration (Keji) | Sat 4 Oct PDF Print E-mail
 
Planetarium: "Constellations of the Zodiac" | Thu 9 Oct PDF Print E-mail

PLANETARIUM SHOW


Time:       Thursday, October 9 , 7:15 p.m.
Location:   Rm. 120, Dunn Bldg, Dalhousie University, 6310 Coburg Rd
Presenter:  Dan Arsenault

"Constellations of the Zodiac"

There are many constellations in the night sky, but those within the zodiac are of special importance. Come to the Halifax planetarium and learn about them and some of the other stars that are visible at this time of year. You might even learn why you have the sign that you do!

Admission:  $5 (at the door); reductions for families (min. age 8 years)

Reservations required. To reserve seats, e-mail  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , stating number of adults and children (8–15).
The Show is about an hour long. Full details will be sent before the Show.
Please do not be late; no admission after the door closes.

Please note that shows are most suitable for ages 8 and up; for younger children, please consider visiting the Discovery Centre for age-appropriate shows in their Digitarium.

 
Planetarium: "Cosmic Clockwork" | Thu 23 Oct PDF Print E-mail

PLANETARIUM SHOW


Time:       Thursday, October 23 , 7:15 p.m.
Location:   Rm. 120, Dunn Bldg, Dalhousie University, 6310 Coburg Rd
Presenter:  Quinn Smith

"Cosmic Clockwork - what makes the Universe tick?"

The night sky is always changing, hour by hour, month by month and year by
year. Come to the Halifax Planetarium and see just what makes the Universe
unfold the way it does.

Admission:  $5 (at the door); reductions for families (min. age 8 years)

Reservations required. To reserve seats, e-mail  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , stating number of adults and children (8–15).
The Show is about an hour long. Full details will be sent before the Show.
Please do not be late; no admission after the door closes.

Please note that shows are most suitable for ages 8 and up; for younger children, please consider visiting the Discovery Centre for age-appropriate shows in their Digitarium.

 
Tantallon Library "Connect with the Mi'kmaw Moons" | Sat 27 Sep PDF Print E-mail

 Connect with Mi'kmaw Moons

Tantallon Public Library 

 Saturday, 27 September 10:30–11:30 a.m.

all ages, family event

How did the Mi'kmaq note the passage of time using the cycle of the Moon and natural events such as the running of maple sap and the croaking of the frogs? Youngsters will enjoy a turtle-rattle craft while the others learn how to recognize lunar features. We will wrap up with a Mi’kmaw friendship chant. Join your hosts Cathy LeBlanc of Acadia First Nation and Dave Chapman of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada.



More information on the project:

This presentation—prepared for children and adults—is part of an ongoing project by Cathy and Dave to investigate the traditional time-keeping customs of the Mi’kmaw nation, before contact with Europeans. Much of this knowledge—handed down by oral tradition—has been lost over the ensuing four centuries. Today, thanks to research by Cheryl Bartlett and others at Cape Breton University, the names of the moon-times have been resurrected and applied to the 12 months of the Gregorian Calendar—but there is more to the story! Twelve synodic months of 29.5 days (Full Moon to Full Moon) only adds up to 354 days, 11 days short of a solar year. Each year, the Moon phases occur about 11 days earlier than the last. This is not a problem in itself, but for one fact: most of the 12 Mi’kmaw moon names refer to seasonally specific environmental events, such as the running of the maple sap, frogs croaking, moose calling, and so on. If one simply applied the 12 names in succession, by rote, the moon names would quickly become out of synchronization with the seasons.

It is as if the lunar clock is ticking faster than the solar clock. This problem occurs throughout the world, and the typical solution is to insert a 13th moon name every two or three years, to keep moons in line with the Sun. These luni-solar calendars are widespread, and there is reference to them in the anthropological literature,specifically in relation to the North American aboriginals.

 

 

 
Observing Session at Grand Pré | Sat 11 Oct PDF Print E-mail

Astronomy in the Valley: Observe at Grand Pré  

 

 

Saturday, October 11, 2014

7:15 p.m.

Old parking lot at Grand Pré National Park

Minas Astronomy Group, the Blomidon Naturalists Society, and Valley Family Fun

Join astronomers Roy Bishop, Larry Bogan, Pat Kelly, and Sherman Williams on SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11 at 7:15 for a tour of the night sky. Location: The old parking lot at Grand Pré National Park, on the east side of the road next to the dykelands. The tour will start with the planet Mars, possibly Saturn very low in the southwestern sky, and the brighter stars visible to the unaided eye. Later, Neptune and Uranus are on the agenda, together with star clusters and galaxies. (Rain/cloud date: the next evening, October 12.

 
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